Toxoplasma Gondii

Mind altering effects of Toxoplasma Gondii and the impetus for testing

  • “What is called genius is the abundance of life and health.”

    Henry David Thoreau

Toxoplasmosis and Schizophrenia

As discussed earlier, the greatest danger presented by T. Gondii is the possibility of developing latent Toxoplasmosis. Latent Toxoplasmosis can lead to a series of dangerous mind-altering health effects

Image of Toxoplasma Gondii

Image of T. Gondii - DPDX - Wikimedia

Schizophrenia

The startling correlation between schizophrenia and patients that tested positive for Toxoplasmosis draws a direct link between the two disorders. This correlation is particularly disturbing when connected to the very high percentage of schizophrenia patients that owned cats (Tanyuksel 2003). An initial study of patients diagnosed with the first episode of schizophrenia found that nearly 50% of subjects tested positive for both Toxoplasmosis and Schizophrenia. This study used the ELISA IgG and SFDT blood tests, finding that 68% of patients tested positive in at least one of the tests and 44% tested positive for both disorders in both tests. This study additionally found that a majority of these subjects also came in to regular contact with cats.

Additionally, a Wahn University study using the ELISA IgG to test for Toxoplasma anti-bodies in the blood of schizophrenic patients found that the presence of antibodies in schizophrenic to be “significantly higher” than those found in control groups of non schizophrenic patients (Wang 2006). Through further investigation they discovered a 2.22-5.12 ratio between patients with Toxoplasma Gondii antibodies and schizophrenia

Additional research into the cause of the Toxoplasmosis and schizophrenia connection has shown a sharp increase in dopamine levels of those with the disease (Yolken 2009). The study found a significant increase in the dopamine levels of nearly all patients that were positive for Toxoplasma anti-bodies through the ELISA test. They would have subsequently been infected with Toxoplasma Gondii and developed latent Toxoplasmosis which slowly, over a period of many years, increased dopamine levels to the point that it caused an onset of schizophrenia.

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56 Responses to “Toxoplasmosis and Schizophrenia”

  1.   Jesus Says:

    No Way!

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